Synod on Family: Like Watching Sausage Getting Made


As an editor, I’m always interested when the fine art of copy editing gets political! I decided to run a “compare docs” program on the first and second versions of the report from the Synod on the Family currently going on at the Vatican. (See above. Scroll down to Part III in document for the “juicy” stuff.)

In case you are just catching up, on Monday, 13 Oct, the Vatican released an update from the Extraordinary Synod on the Family. Basically, at the half-way point, they wanted to let folks know what was going on.

Pope Francis is trying a “sunshine strategy” at the notoriously closed-door Vatican. Parts of the synod were even “live-streamed”! He seems to believe that many of the worlds 1.1 billion Catholics — and certainly most of its priests can handle the truth of how things are done, that they can handle spirited discussion, that they can handle more than one idea at a time. (This seems generally to be true, except for one or two really piqued U.S. cardinals.)

Pope Francis trusts that people are complex and intrinsically beautiful and that so is truth. In this, he is totally in sync with his predecessors.

After the first update on Monday, 13 October, the document went to small groups (based on language groups) for review. The agreed upon changes were then entered into a new document, which was released on Thursday, 16 October. (The final document will probably be released next week.)

You’ll recognize it by edits that now identify some families as “broken” (not “wounded”) and calling churches to “provide for” homosexuals (not “welcome”). These changes were ONLY made in the English language version, not the official Italian version.

Theology, like politics, can be messy to watch being made. However Pope Francis may be recalling the words of he predecessor a few years ago when Pope Benedict XVI said at Christmas in 2012 :

“I would say that the Christian can afford to be supremely confident, yes, fundamentally certain that he can venture freely into the open sea of the truth, without having to fear for his Christian identity. To be sure, we do not possess the truth, the truth possesses us: Christ, who is the truth, has taken us by the hand, and we know that his hand is holding us securely on the path of our quest for knowledge. Being inwardly held by the hand of Christ makes us free and keeps us safe: free – because if we are held by him, we can enter openly and fearlessly into any dialogue; safe – because he does not let go of us, unless we cut ourselves off from him. At one with him, we stand in the light of truth.”

Here’s the link to the original English version as of 13 Oct 2014, prior to the small group review. (Scroll down about halfway through the post.)

Here are the links to the 3 English-speaking small group (Circuli Minori) reviews: English Group (Circulus Anglicus) “A” – Moderator: Card. Raymond Burke English Group (Circulus Anglicus) “B” – Moderator: Card. Wilfrid Napier, OFM English Group (Circulus Anglicus) “C” – Moderator: Mons. Joseph Kurtz

Here’s the link to the English version current as of 17 October 2014.

Serve up some buns and sauerkraut with that sausage!–Rose Marie Berger

Pope Francis’ American Chess Game

Pope Francis greets people after celebrating Mass at St. Anne's Parish within VaticanPope Francis has the heart of a Franciscan, the head of a Jesuit, and the body of a Little Brother of Jesus. American Catholics have been wondering when the Francis Effect would begin to impact the American chess board – specifically the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. That happened over the weekend.

In “the most shocking major move the American hierarchy has seen since the turn of the millennium,” Francis appointed the moderate to progressive archbishop of Spokane, Blase Cupich, to the third most powerful diocese in the U.S.: Chicago.

At the same time, Francis ecclesiastically exiled the infamous “I won’t serve communion to John Kerry” Cardinal Raymond Burke by not promoting him and giving him a commission in outer darkness (otherwise known as the ceremonial head of the Sovereign Military Order of Malta).

“[Pope Francis’]simple lifestyle coupled with his compassionate outreach to people is contrasted to his stern admonitions to priests and bishops chastising their sense of privilege and calling these shepherds to “smell like sheep”, indicating his desire for the hierarchy to engage closely with the people. His pastoral style appears contradictory because it is full of demonstrable compassion with almost militaristic acts of cleaning out the Vatican Bank and stabilizing the dysfunctional Curia, removing prelates who disagree with him. Of particular note is the news release of his actions on Cardinal Burke and the appointment of Abp. Blase Cupich to the Chicago See.” –from American Catholic Council newsletter (Sept. 22, 2014)

Read more about Cardinal Raymond Burke here.
Read more about Archbishop Blase Cupich here.