December 7: Advent and Pearl Harbor

“Ask not, doubt not. You have, My Heart, already chosen the joy of Advent. As a force against the great uncertainty, bravely tell yourself, ‘It is the Advent of the great God’” —Karl Rahner

“What is your opinion? If a shepherd has a hundred sheep and one of them goes astray, will the shepherd not leave the ninety-nine in the hills and go in search of the stray?“—Matthew 18: 12

200px-MitsuoFuchidaIn the United States yesterday, December 7, is remembered as “Pearl Harbor Day.” Early on a Sunday morning in 1941 the Japanese military attacked a U.S. naval base on Oahu, Hawaii, killing 2,403 Americans. There were about 100 Japanese killed. The Japanese squadron leader was Mitsuo Fuchida.

“We hate, and are hated in return, and then we hate more, and we have all seen where that can lead,” said Fuchida years later. But, he said, “We love, and we are likely to be loved in return, which begins the cycle of love.”

In the late 1940s, Fuchida heard some Japanese POWs returning from U.S. detainee camps, talking about an American teenager who visited them. She brought them soap, toothpaste, and asked what else she could do for them. The prisoners didn’t trust her. Finally they asked why she had been so kind to them, her enemies. She told them that her parents had been Christian missionaries in Japan and the Philippines.

They had been murdered, beheaded, by Japanese soldiers who thought they were spies. The girl’s life began to be consumed by hate for the Japanese, until she was able to reconnect with what her parents had taught: Love of enemies and forgiveness. She gave “aid and comfort” to the enemy to honor her parents and because she was a Christian.

Mitsuo Fuchida was deeply moved by this story. Eventually, Fuchida became a Christian out of a need to heal the hate in his own life. “I have participated in the cycle of hate for much of my life,” said Fuchida. “For the rest of my life I want to begin the cycle of love as often and in as many places as possible.”

Fuchida traveled extensively in the United States. Every time a Pearl Harbor survivor approached him Fuchida bowed slightly and said “Gomenasai” [I’m sorry], then reached out and took their hand.

To whom do you need to apologize before the Christ Child arrives?

Breathe in. Breathe out. Ad…..vent.

With gratitude to Pax Christi USA where some of these reflections first appeared in print..

Sadako’s Peace Crane Arrives at Pearl Harbor

sadako
This origami paper crane made by Sadako Sasaki will be donated. It is said that a candy wrapper was used. (Provided by Sadako Legacy)

On Sept. 21, 2013, a tiny paper crane made by Sadako Sasaki, the Hiroshima girl who had hoped to survive radiation-induced leukemia by folding 1,000 paper cranes, arrived at the Pearl Harbor museum.

The exhibit opened on the day more than 200 countries celebrate the UN’s International Day of Peace and Nonviolence. Sadako was 2 years old when the U.S. dropped a nuclear bomb less than a mile from her home.

Here’s a bit from the news article:

“An origami created by a girl who contracted leukemia and died as a result of Hiroshima’s atomic bombing will be displayed at the visitor center of a memorial for victims of the attack on Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. …

Sadako Sasaki folded hundreds of origami paper cranes while she battled leukemia. She died in 1955 at the age of 12.

The origami is one of three owned by the nonprofit organization Sadako Legacy headed by her elder brother, Masahiro Sasaki, 70.

It is said in Japan that a person’s wishes will come true if he or she folds 1,000 paper cranes.

“We hope the country that started war by attacking Pearl Harbor (in 1941) and the other that ended the war by dropping the atomic bombs (in 1945) will reach an end of the war from the heart, discarding their old grudges,” Sasaki said.

“We hope the origami will serve as a catalyst for that.”

Clifton Truman Daniel, the 55-year-old grandson of Harry Truman, the U.S. president who authorized the 1945 atomic bombings, worked as a go-between so the origami could go on display at the Visitor Center of the USS Arizona Memorial in Honolulu.”

Read more here.