Abbot Philip: The Spirituality of Easter

Abbot Philip

From Abbot Philip at Christ in the Desert Monastery in New Mexico:

“Part of the spirituality of Easter is learning to believe in the presence of God in all that happens. All we need do is think of the earlier followers of Jesus who were so discouraged and disheartened when He was crucified. From a human point of view, that was the end. All of the hopes of His followers were dashed and broken. So a challenge of spirituality is to believe that God is always present and always bringing about a good in every situation. We don’t always see the good. Perhaps even often we don’t see the good. Yet we are called to believe.

At the heart of all spirituality is this deep and unfailing belief that God is God, that God is present and that God is involved in all that happens. Immediately this takes us to a different level of belief. Our world today, to an enormous extent, believes that there is nothing after death. So many Christians even believe that now. Jesus is a good figure and a good man, but surely Jesus was not God! Once a Christian no longer believes that Jesus is God, then such a person really can no longer be called a Christian. Such a person may well live in a way that brings him or her to heaven, but in this life there is a huge lack of faith.

How different our lives are when we believe that there is another life after death! In the past, of course, some would say that we Christians use the idea or even the reality of heaven to avoid living the realities of this life! For sure, when we believe that this life is not the whole meaning of human reality, then our understanding of how to live changes incredibly. It is more important to be good than to achieve a lot of money or have a lot of sexual relationships or to have power over others. What matters is living in Jesus Christ, living as He did and trying to love others and serve others. Continue reading “Abbot Philip: The Spirituality of Easter”

Abbot Philip: Change is part of our Spirituality

Abbot Phillip
Abbot Phillip

“Changes are part of normal life but are also a part of our spirituality. I dislike changes very much and prefer that everything goes on without change. I dislike it when people leave the community. I dislike it when we have to discuss how to change various parts of our life. I dislike it when I have to make personal changes. And so on and on and on. Yet I recognize that my likes or dislikes never stop the need for change and adaptation. Over the years I have come to see the positive side of changes and the challenges that changes put in front of all of us as humans.Appreciating the value of change does not mean that I like change! Part of my personal spirituality has come to be accepting things that I don’t like, appreciating things that I don’t like, and being still and silent and not reacting about things that I don’t like. This has served me well over the years.

I was sharing with one of the brothers the other day that when I was a young superior … who was almost 30 years older than I, kept telling me this: don’t write or speak when you are angry! Over the years I finally learned that he was correct. Not writing or speaking when I am angry could become a way to avoid an issue, but that is not what it is supposed to be. Rather, it is a way of remaining in peace so that I can truly see before I act. Anger is only one of the ways in which we can be blinded. All of our natural desires can pull us away from this inner place where we see things as they truly are. As I continue to grow older, I find some solace in still learning how to be peaceful and to see what is happening, rather than just reacting to what is happening.

Sometimes I laugh to myself when I look back at how impulsive I was as a young monk and then a young superior. My temper can still flare, but much less than when I was young. The last three meetings that I have been at have been so peaceful for me because of learning to be still. One of the Italian abbots asked me: what is wrong with you, Philip? You haven’t commented on anything.
I replied to him that finally I had learned to be still and just to listen. Most of the time any views that I have are expressed by others and I don’t need to say them. I still speak up if something is clearly unacceptable to me, but most of the time, if I just wait, everything turns out well enough. The few decisions that I would disagree with are usually not important at all.

Someone told me that I was avoiding responsibility by not speaking out. From my point of view, this is simply not true. If there is something that I totally disagree with and which is set to become the norm, then I do speak out. Others listen to me more, the less I speak. I see much of this way of thinking expressed in the wisdom literature of Scripture.”–Abbot Philip, Christ in the Desert Monastery

Read Abbot Philip’s complete reflection.

Abbot Philip: The Practice of Lectio Divina

"The Road to Christ in the Desert, I" by Bob Baker
“The Road to Christ in the Desert, I” by Bob Baker

It’s been a busy spring for me and postings here have been less regular, but you are constantly in my heart where ever you are!–Rose

Reflections from Christ in the Desert monastery’s Abbot Philip on the practice of Lectio Divina:

I have been reading the Gospel of Matthew for my lectio. Lectio is part of the monastic way of life. It is a slow and prayerful reading of the Scriptures. In our Benedictine tradition, this practice of the slow and prayerful reading of the Scriptures is fundamental. The purpose is to know the Scriptures profoundly and this can take place only over a long period of time. This type of knowledge of the Scriptures is focused on encounter with the Word and no on some form of academic knowledge. It requires a daily commitment on the part of the monk. At Christ in the Desert we have a small booklet that we call our Customary.

It sets down for the monks some of the things that we do and sometimes how to do them. Regarding Lectio, the Customary tells us that a monk must strive to spend at least a half hour each day in silent prayer and at least one hour each day in this practice of prayerful reading with a focus on Scripture.All of us who have been monks for a number of years know that it is easy to avoid praying and to avoid reading Scripture. It sounds so easy at first. Continue reading “Abbot Philip: The Practice of Lectio Divina”

Abbot Philip: Virtues and Vices in Lenten Practice

monks3Lenten reflections from Benedictine Abbot Philip in New Mexico:

…[I]n Lent we can become focused almost exclusively on sin rather than on virtue. We are struggling to overcome our sinfulness and yet that does not mean to focus on sin. Rather it should mean to focus on living for God and that means to focus on virtue. It is also good to remember that the least offensive of the capital sins is lust, excessive sexual appetites. Often Christians tend to think of such sexual appetites and the worst of the sins. Instead, the worst of the capital sins is pride. From the least to the greatest of these sins, the order would be: lust, gluttony, greed, sloth, wrath, envy and pride. Lots of us have different orders in our own minds, but this would be the classical order. The corresponding virtues are chastity, temperance, charity, diligence, forgiveness, kindness and humility.

For us monks, humility is often pointed out to us by Saint Benedict in his Rule for Monks. Saint Benedict has a very long chapter on the degrees of humility. Many people today do not take the time to read that chapter well because some of the ways in which Saint Benedict expresses himself go against our modern sensibilities. For instance, Saint Benedict tells us that we must not only think of ourselves as worse than others but believe it in the depths of our hearts. For many people today, who already have low self-esteem, this can be a fatal recipe. It was C. S. Lewis who stated in one of his books that the problem today for many people is not pride but lack of self-esteem.This does not call us to abandon humility, however, but to understand it more profoundly so that we do not confuse humility with a lack of self-esteem. Instead of trying to reinvent humility, we must simply rediscover its reality so that we can live it more completely in our lives. Continue reading “Abbot Philip: Virtues and Vices in Lenten Practice”

Abbot Philip: Why Being Regular is Good for Your Prayer Life

Abbot Phillip
Abbot Phillip

Abbot Philip is serving at Christ in the Desert Monastery in New Mexico. I find his “notes” very helpful. He writes:

“One of the aspects of my life is that often I cannot keep any kind of regular schedule. For sure, I keep the external schedule in the monastery when I am home, but even within that schedule, there are aspects that simply do not work for me. I love to have a short nap after Vigils, but often that is impossible because of something that must be done at that time. After Holy Mass I like to be quiet and still but that is not always possible when brothers come to knock at my door. After Terce I try to go for a walk, but sometimes there are other appointments that get in the way.I like to try to get my regular work (answering letters, mostly, but sometimes working on music for the community) done so that I can have a nap after lunch. That time after lunch should be sacred for all monks, but there are still times when it must be give up for the sake of seeing someone. And so my days go by.

I often think of myself as one who works to have a regular order in his life, but who most often must respond to the exigencies of whatever is happening. When my trips are also added into this mix, it is easy to see why all I can do is work towards order in my life. There is always a basic order but it never is able to be lived for long periods of time. Sometimes I long for a type of work where I could clock in and clock out and no one could bother me afterwards. Each of us has his or her own life.

Most of us have some order in our lives. Many live as I do: seeking order and sometimes finding it. Why order? Because with order we are able to focus our inner energies toward prayer and towards that deep relationship with God that is at the heart of any Christian life.

The ultimate order, of course, is simply to live in God and to do all for God. For most of us, that requires an inner effort, both of mind and of will. In order to focus ourselves, daily order can be helpful. There are people who are completely ordered externally with no thought of God. Thus order is not a guarantee to think of God and to live for God alone. But it can help. For myself, when I let myself long for the Lord, I find that I want to put more order in my life so that I can give more time and attention to Him.

At other times, I find myself so caught up just in surviving and getting things done that I let my longing for the Lord simmer and almost become extinct, even though I seem almost always aware of His presence. So for me, both order and longing for the Lord are elements that help me stay on the path of the Lord. There are wonderful moments on the path and there are times when it is just difficult to keep walking. That is a normal part of my life. I rejoice when things are going well and I struggle when they are not. I continue to seek to put order in my life, no matter how often it eludes me. Most of all, I try to allow my heart to long for Him who is the only meaning of my life.”–Abbot Philip

Read more from Abbot Philip here.

Abbot Philip: ‘The Center From Which We Live’

Abbot Phillip
Abbot Phillip

“Spiritual life is the life that we live every day. It is not something apart from our daily lives. Jesus told us in the Gospels that it is not what goes into a person that defiles a person, but that which comes out of the heart. He was talking about food taboos in His own time but the words help us understand that we must live from the heart and be aware of what comes forth from our hearts. In some traditions, the heart is the place of feelings. In other traditions the heart is the place where feelings and thoughts come together. It is this meaning that I use. We can call this place the heart, the center of our being, our soul — or whatever. In each of us there is a center from which we live. Part of growing up is discovering that center and learning how to live from the center of our being. As we grow, we can come to recognize that not all feelings help us live well and neither do all thoughts. We recognize that actions have results and that not all the results of our actions help us live well.”–Abbot Philip, Christ in the Desert Monastery

Read Abbot Philip’s entire reflection.

Abbot Philip: Beauty Forms Us in Beauty

Ceiling of LightsAbbot Philip lives at Christ in the Desert Monastery in New Mexico (left), but has been on retreat in Hawaii for the last few months:

“As far as I can tell, this will be my last Notebook from Hawaii this year. I am ready to leave later today and return to the mainland. It has been a wonderful time of renewal and restoration for me. One of the aspects of my life here and at Christ in the Desert is to live in incredible beauty.

I remember almost 35 years ago when a Trappist abbot commented to me that it is nearly impossible to lead a deep spiritual life in an ugly place. Monasteries that are founded in ugly places have to change them into beautiful places or they have to relocate. Part of our spiritual life has to include some awareness of our surroundings and an awareness of how those surroundings affect us. This is another aspect of living the incarnation.

Continue reading “Abbot Philip: Beauty Forms Us in Beauty”

Abbot Philip: Is There Value in Obedience?

monk-newmexico-240348-oAbbot Philip serves at Christ in the Desert monastery in New Mexico. I’m often encouraged and enriched by his reflections. I’m sometimes deeply challenged by his male perspective and his sense of traditionalism. His reflections below on the nature of obedience — which bring so many issues for me as a woman — are nevertheless insightful and ultimately freeing for me.

“Sometimes people who are not monks find it difficult to understand any value to obedience. When I was a young monk, I had all kinds of questions about obedience and was not sure that I could ever obey wholeheartedly. Yes I always obeyed. When I came up for solemn vows, my abbot told me that the other solemnly professed (the Chapter) was not convinced that I would ever obey anyone. So we talked about obedience. At the end of the talk, the abbot assured me that I did always obey. He also told me, however, that I seemed to have to question things before I obeyed. Continue reading “Abbot Philip: Is There Value in Obedience?”

Abbot Philip: ‘The Inner Peace of the Soul Is Not Always Easy to Reclaim’

monk-newmexico-240348-o“Spirituality is about living with reality and always living in the connection with God.  Spirituality is not exactly about praying, especially not about reciting prayers.  It is about maintaining a living relationship with God at all times.  It surely includes praying and includes reciting prayers.  As a monk, I am always reciting prayers.  The challenge is not just to recite them, but to pray them. Here in the monastery we have classes on the Psalms, for instance, and we can learn a lot about Psalms and about other Scriptures and even about hymns and prayers.  The challenge is always to pray the Psalms, pray the Scriptures, and pray all the hymns and prayers.

Central to this challenge is to come to known my own heart and to be able to focus my heart on the presence of God.  If I can manage that, then I can also begin to add to that the knowledge of what I am saying if I am involved in spoken prayer or spoken community prayer.  The basic element, however, is always to have my heart set on the Lord, seeking His face. Most of us are able to be still and to pray, as long as that is all that we have to do and as long as nothing else very important is on our minds.  The challenge is to keep that basic focus of our souls in the Lord when we have to pray with others, when we must live with others, when we have challenges, when we meet conflict, when we meet complex life situations. Only practice allows us to maintain this inner life of prayer at all times.

Continue reading “Abbot Philip: ‘The Inner Peace of the Soul Is Not Always Easy to Reclaim’”

Abbot Philip: The Importance of Mind Control

monk-newmexico-240348-o

“The early desert monks and nuns realized that there is a huge importance in learning about how thoughts work in our lives. Only by beginning to deal with our thoughts can we begin to deal with all of our lives. I hate to say that we must control our thoughts because that really does not describe the challenge. The challenge is to learn to live with our thoughts in such a way that we can direct them in some sense. If we try to control them, then there is usually a rebellion!

Learning to live with our thoughts is one of the reasons for learning how to be silent and still with the Lord. We focus on being silent and still, not on stopping thoughts. When thoughts do come, we simply let them pass by because our attention is on being silent and still. We have to practice this before we can truly understand it. And it takes continual practice to enable us to turn aside from thoughts that really attract us and focus on other thoughts.

Another way of learning to live with our thoughts is to develop interests in many things. For some people, a good book can draw and attract their thoughts in a very positive way. For others, a hobby can do the same trick. For still others, a long walk or a vigorous period of exercise can help. Still other persons can relax and let go of attachments by listening to beautiful music and being drawn out of themselves into the music. Others can play a musical instrument and get totally caught up into that. Others can do works of charity, such as feeding the hungry, clothing the naked, etc.

ChristinthedesertThere are countless ways to learn how to live with our thoughts. Why would be want to do that? Because our decisions in our lives come from our thoughts. We want to be able to see our own thought process and to be able to direct our thoughts. In that we, we can build the Kingdom of God together. What often happens in present culture is that our thoughts possess us instead of us possessing our thoughts. This is why it is so important to begin now to know how to live with my thoughts and how to direct my thoughts.

So often I have heard people tell me to go where my thoughts lead me. To some extent, I can understand that and even honor it. On the other hand, I have to know that not everywhere my thoughts might take me is a good place for me to be. There is always a matter of discernment: I have to choose if the direction of my thoughts really is in agreement with the deepest choices of my life.

Each of us is invited to live life to its fullness. In order to do that, we need to listen attentively to those who have gone before. When we find ourselves wanting to set out on our own, we need to be strong enough to hear what we may not want to hear. We may even try to run away from the things that we do not want to hear. Deep within us we remember that it is God calling us and it is God to whom we want to respond. …”–Abbot Philip, OSB

Read Abbot Philip’s whole essay (Abbot’s Notebook, Oct. 9, 2013).