Keystone XL Would Divide Jobs, Conquer Low-Income and Native American Communities

notarsandsThe only argument FOR the Keystone XL pipeline that held any moral weight was that pipeline construction would produce “jobs, jobs, jobs.” The need for jobs is a desperate one. And any construction project will produce sporadic work. But no self-respecting hard-hatter would work on a project that’s going to overheat the world.

Read an excerpt from yesterday’s Sojourners blog post on the Keystone XL and jobs:

When it comes to the Keystone XL pipeline, the oil and gas industry want you to believe that you have to choose between jobs and prairie grass. This tactic is called the “divide and conquer” or “divide and rule” strategy. It’s as old as the empires of ancient Greece and Rome. It still works because human nature hasn’t changed that much.

Two years ago I sat down across the table from Dr. Kerri-Ann Jones, the highest ranking State Department official (short of the Secretary of State) to weigh in on the Keystone XL pipeline permit process. A group of religious leaders were delivering thousands of petitions to Dr. Jones asking her to to stop the pipeline.

I said to her, “If this decision about the pipeline was made purely based on the climate science, we wouldn’t be here having this discussion.” She’s a scientist. She knows the score. She didn’t disagree. “But,” she said, “everywhere we go across the country we hear about the need for jobs – especially in the middle of the country.”

Divide and conquer.

In order to successfully break up a government or army (or trajectory of change), the stronger power pits sides against the other — exploit the weaknesses of both. The stronger power manipulates the sides to foster feuds and infighting, which suck up precious time and energy.

The whole goal of “divide in conquer” is to keep the smaller movements from uniting, prevent the “sides” from joining forces against the oppressor. Why? Because it is much harder to break them apart once they have aligned. …–Rose Marie Berger

Read the whole commentary. ColorLines’ produced a great infographic showing just how sad the jobs argument is!

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