Beltway Buzz: D.C.’s Fancy Bees and the ‘First Beehive’ at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave

Fairmont-BeesBees bring joy to life. The more bees there are in the District of Columbia the better off we’ll be. First Lady of Cool Michelle inaugurated the First Beehive last year at the White House along with the First Organic Garden. DCist blogger Vanessa Schipani has a nice update on how those Obama Bees are going. (My favorite part is that White House beekeeper Charlie Brandts rides the subway with his buzzy little friends. Ah yes, it recalls the psalm, ” They surrounded me like bees, they blazed like a fire of thorns” 118:12.)

White House beekeeper Charlie Brandts has transported more than one thousand bees using Metro — on more than one occasion. Brandts was the guest speaker at the D.C. Department of Parks and Recreation urban beekeeping course last Monday, the second class in a series of four. A carpenter for the White House, Brandts keeps bees at his home in Maryland. When President Barack Obama got word about Brandts’s hives, a green-eyed commander in chief asked Brandts to set up one for the White House — the First Beehive. In its first full year’s harvest, the hive produced a considerable amount of honey — all told, around 134 pounds — went into the Obama family’s bellies. Fresh honey is delicious, no doubt, but Obama had other, less hedonistic, reasons for harboring thousands of stinging insects next to his organic garden: Bees are pollinators, and bees are dying. A worldwide disappearance of honeybees, known as colony collapse disorder, is thought to result from a combination of disease and environmental factors. …

Urban hives produce exquisite honey. It’s extremely unique and flavorful because the bees collect nectar from myriad types of flowers that grow in our backyards and parks. This is another reason bees should have a home in our cities, especially DC, which has more floral variety than you might imagine. As for living and working alongside a potential enemy — bees will sometimes sting people, of course — it shouldn’t be an issue in a city for which division and acrimony is a cottage industry. As Brandts said, “Bees are more interested in nectar than politics.”–Vanessa Schipani (Read the whole piece here.)

In other news, the luxury hotel chair Fairmont is housing bees on their hotel rooftops around the world, including here in downtown D.C.’s West End neighborhood. So sweet!

In response to the nation’s Honey Bee shortage and as part of the Fairmont Washington DC’s environmental stewardship program, the hotel has recently welcomed 105,000 Italian honey bees to their new home.  The rooftop of The Fairmont Washington, DC is now abuzz with three honey beehives and their residents.  The bees will enhance the hotel’s culinary program along with its interior courtyard garden that already provides fresh herbs and flowers such as edible pansies, and the plants, trees and flowers in the surrounding West End neighborhood.

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